Homesteaders, Off-gridders and Preppers- Welcome!

Welcome to Off Grid and Free My Path to the Wilderness

Aerial View of our Homestead on Hockley Lake

Our Remote Off-Grid Wilderness Homestead

 

To homesteaders, off-gridders and preppers everywhere- Greetings from the Canadian wilderness! Welcome to Off Grid and Free My Path to the Wilderness!

Imagine if you can, living so remote that access is only by float plane. You won’t see another person for 6 months at a time.

Twin Otter landing on Hockley Lake

Twin Otter Landing at Hockley Lake

No daily mail delivery, no commute to a mundane 9 to 5 job, no easy access to malls and supermarkets, and none of civilization’s chaos and noise. Nothing but the silence of the forest encompasses you. Continue reading

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Freezer Slaw for Winter Salads

For those of us wishing to live as self-sufficiently as possible, homegrown winter salads are a challenge. However, if you have access to a freezer, preserving garden cabbage as freezer slaw helps quell the desire for a crunchy, crisp salad in the depth of winter. Here’s how we make freezer slaw for winter salads.

Slaw Ready to Package for Freezer

Slaw Ready to Package for Freezer

Slaw From the Freezer – Really?

We’ve always grown lots of cabbages, as many as 12 to 15 heads of storage type cabbage each season, and we’re only a household of 2. It’s a versatile vegetable which can be used in numerous soups including Cabbage Sausage Soup, cooked side dishes such as baked cabbage, entrees such as New England Boiled Dinner or cabbage rolls, not to mention salads such as various versions of cole slaw. It can also be preserved for long term storage by several methods: fermenting it into sauerkraut, blanching it for the freezer and/or by root cellaring it. Continue reading

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Look at What You’ve Accomplished!

Every time we tap into the daily news, it seems we are greeted with more chaos and turmoil. Today, we’d like to share some upbeat, happy news. You folks who have supported us with your encouragement and book purchases have our heartfelt gratitude. Johanna and I wanted you to see what you’ve accomplished. You have provided electric lights to a remote medical clinic in Uganda! The following is a write up:

Crew Assembling Solar Array

Crew Assembling Solar Array

“The Gayaza Health Center II in central Uganda is not a clinic serving a huge number of people (some of the clinics may serve 20,000 or more people), but it is in an extremely impoverished area 13 kilometers from the nearest grid and currently with 0 hours of electricity. The staff use their mobile phone flashlights and/or kerosene in the clinic, which is only open 5 days/week for 10 hours/day. With electrification it will be open 7 days a week for 24 hours/day. The clinic is extremely remote and serves a dispersed catchment area of 5,473 people (as per the last census in 2017). They currently treat 350 patients every week (200 of them are children) for a variety of ailments including malaria, diarrhea and fever.”

Crew Roof Mounting Solar Array

Crew Roof Mounting Solar Array

Something Most Take for Granted

Something Most Take for Granted

When Johanna and I were asked what we wanted on the sign, we asked that our supporters be acknowledged in some way. Unfortunately, the text would have created a bill board instead of a small concise sign, so, although not written on the sign, Johanna and I could not have done this without you.

Hospital Staff

Hospital Staff

This is public acknowledgement that you folks are the real heroes here. All we did was pass money on from you to this worthy project. From our perspective, what better way to celebrate over 40 years of being off grid than by lighting up a community health center far removed from the grid. Every person who purchased our book made a contribution to this and we sincerely hope you take pride in the accomplishment. Over time, we will light up more medical clinics that are in desperate need of simple lights. Well done folks! Thank you!

Until next time, keep the dream alive! We wish you a great day!

Ron and Johanna

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Posted in Homesteader's News, Uncategorized | 4 Comments

Make the Most of Your Garden’s Bounty

It’s the height of the growing season. The garden is yielding a bounty of fresh produce each day. How can you possibly make use of it all? That’s the dilemma for beginning and experienced gardeners alike. How does one make the most of your garden’s bounty?

Basket of Fresh Picked Vegetables

Basket of Fresh Picked Vegetables

The Evolution of the Process

I began gardening as a teenager with my dad being my tutor. At the time, our garden was pretty basic: peas, corn, beans, broccoli, tomatoes, cabbage, carrots and zucchini. Nothing so “exotic” as Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, leeks or Belgian endive. Once I began homesteading in my late 20’s, I expanded my garden horizons and began growing a greater variety of vegetables. At the same time I made it my mission to find ways to utilize what I grew. After all why go to the trouble and work if the vegetables and fruits of your labor go unused and are wasted because of a lack of knowledge regarding their preparation, lack of inspiration on ways to use them or techniques to store them longer term.
Continue reading

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Thoughts Regarding The Coronavirus

This will be one of those non-negotiable, we won’t budge on our philosophy type posts. Johanna and I are a bit frustrated! We felt it might be of value to some of you to discuss our thoughts regarding the coronavirus that has plagued the world recently. The first thing is we hope everybody remained safe and healthy and other than some scares and inconvenience, came out of this unscathed.

My Supply of the Building Block of Life

My Supply of the Building Block of Life

Our Philosophy

If you’ve been with us for awhile, you know we are not doomsday preppers. We are simple, down to earth people who wish to be more self-reliant. By that very nature, it means we are better prepared than most since we provide much of our food, energy, water etc ourselves. We give no conscious thought to preparing for a specific calamity. In more generalized terms, we like that feeling of independence associated with growing our own wholesome foods and not having to worry about power outages yet if there are disruptions to either, we are relatively unaffected which is a nice side bonus.
Continue reading

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Quilting, Weaving and Other Worthwhile Homestead Pursuits

We recently received a comment from a reader of our book The Self-Sufficient Backyard: For the Independent Homesteader who asked how I do quilting and weaving on the homestead and whether my fabric and yarn are purchased from elsewhere. This post is dedicated to answering questions regarding quilting, weaving and other worthwhile homestead pursuits.

Home Made Hand Stitched Quilt

Home Made Hand Stitched Quilt

Quilting

Traditionally quilts were made from whatever scraps were kicking around be they pieces of intact fabric salvaged from worn out or outgrown garments or leftovers after cutting out new garments. In other words, they were the result of what we would term recycling or repurposing. I made my first few quilts this way using what my mom had in her scrap bag. Continue reading

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What Does It Mean to Live Off-Grid?

Bear with us for a minute and this will all make sense in the end. As kids, (only a few short years ago), we were entertained by some great TV. One of the many shows we watched was the dynamic duo, Batman and Robin. The show presents a perplexing problem, one we’ve wrestled with for years with no easy answer. Were Batman and Robin living off grid? Stay tuned to this Bat Channel for the definitive answer! So, what does it mean to live off-grid?

Nova Scotia Homestead

Nova Scotia Homestead

For each of us doing so, it means slightly different things and while each of us off gridders have come up with our own solutions to the challenges life off-grid presents, the one underlying theme is this as defined by Wikipedia:

Off-the-grid homes are autonomous; they do not rely on municipal water supply, sewer, natural gas, electrical power grid, or similar utility services. Continue reading

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A First Step To Self-Reliance – Plant a Garden

You’ve decided to become more self-reliant, but don’t know where to begin. With 40 years of homesteading and self-reliance behind us, we’d suggest you plant a garden as your first step. This is especially important in this new virus era when some food items are being rationed or when income security is in question. Let’s take the first step to self-reliance by planting a garden.

This is What it's All About

This is What it’s All About

First Step To Self-Reliance

If your diet consists of frozen pizzas, microwave burritos, cheese doodles and fruit roll ups, planting a garden won’t help you in your pursuit of self-reliance unless you’re willing to change your eating habits. But if you’re looking to free yourself from reliance on supermarket produce and commercially prepared canned and frozen fruits and vegetables, then a garden is a viable, important first step toward your ultimate goal. Continue reading

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Our New Book – The Self-Sufficient Backyard: For the Independent Homesteader

Johanna and I are thrilled to announce that our new book The Self Sufficient Backyard: For the Independent Homesteader is available for purchase in both ebook format and/or printed copy. Here is the link to the webpage: https://self-sufficient-backyard.com/my-book/

The Self-Sufficient Backyard: For the Independent Homesteader

The Self-Sufficient Backyard: For the Independent Homesteader

We are not aware of any book that has been published that is as comprehensive in its coverage of self-reliant topics. The following is the table of contents.

The Self-Sufficient Backyard: For the Independent Homesteader Table of Contents:

Chapter 1 – 40 Years Homesteading

      Where it all Began …………………………………………..

      The Beginning – The First Homestead ………………

      Time for a Change – A Move to the Wilderness …

      The Final Frontier – The Last Homestead …………

Chapter 2 – The Homestead Plan ………………………….

      More Questions ………………………………………………

      The Sketch ……………………………………………………..

      Sketch Details …………………………………………………

Chapter 3 – Site Selection …………………………………….. Continue reading

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Garden Record Keeping Ensures Success

Garden record keeping is part of ensuring a successful garden. The mundane task may seem trivial, unnecessary, and of no value but the truth is once you get into the habit of recording vital bits of information, you’ll wonder how you ever managed without this valuable wealth of data. We touched on the topic in our previous post but let’s delve into garden record keeping in more detail.

Garden Notes

Garden Notes

Why Keep Records?

The biggest reason to keep records is so you can make a comparison against previous years. You can compare frost dates in spring and fall, at a glance see what you planted in what location and look for patterns, be they weather patterns of rainfall (or the lack of it), or patterns of poor production. If you notice any vegetable grown in a particular spot does poorly no matter what the vegetable is, this likely means the soil in that location needs improvement. Good record keeping will show if the garden is behind or on schedule as compared to previous years and whether or not yields are up or down. Finally records can serve as a reminder it’s time to do certain duties such as get transplants started indoors or get the fall spinach in the ground before it’s too late to harvest a crop. Continue reading

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Mapping Out Your Vegetable Garden

Mapping out your vegetable garden so you have a plan on paper once planting time arrives is a key component to a successful growing season. So is detailed note taking. I have a sketch of every garden I’ve ever planted, about 45 different drawings at last count, and I’ve never regretted the small effort it took to commit the plan to paper. As well, I am meticulous in writing down varieties, dates, first harvest, frost and any other pertinent details. So let’s talk about mapping out a vegetable garden.

Garden Plan

Garden Plan

Meticulous Notes

Meticulous Notes

Why a Paper Sketch?

Having a layout on paper ensures you have allocated room for every item you wish to grow. It ensures you don’t forget something or run out of room at planting time. It can also save time during the hectic spring rush of planting because you aren’t wasting time figuring out where everything will go. Continue reading

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Planning Your Vegetable Garden – Part 1

With 40 years of off-grid homesteading under our belts, we can sincerely say that one of the keys to self-reliance is a successful vegetable garden. A well thought out, well planned garden can save time, effort and aggravation come spring and summer so why not spend some time this winter while the cold north winds are howling planning your vegetable garden for this coming season.

Hockley Lake Garden

Hockley Lake Garden

Factors to Consider

If you’re a seasoned gardener, begin by looking back and assessing the previous year’s garden. This is where record keeping can be of real value. Refer to your notes to see what worked and what didn’t. What would you like to do differently? Would you like to try a new technique – maybe trying to grow cukes or melons vertically for instance? Perhaps you want to try a new variety of something or maybe even a completely new vegetable you’ve never grown before such as Witloof chicory or mache. Did you have a shortfall of any item and if so is the shortfall consistent from year to year? It’s normal in any given year to have an over abundance of an item while the next year it may not do as well but if you consistently run short of an item you may want to plant more this year. On the other hand, do you consistently have too much of something. So much that it goes to waste. If so, reducing the amount planted may be called for. Continue reading

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Mulches and Mulching

We’ve used mulches on our gardens from day one. Mulching is a key component to a happy garden in our opinion. There are a number of benefits to mulching. Let’s delve deeper into mulches and mulching.

Chipping Brush with Proper Safety Gear

Chipping Brush with Proper Safety Gear

Benefits of Mulching

It helps control weeds, keeps valuable moisture in the ground where it is best utilized by the plants, makes for a tidy garden, helps prevent soil compaction in the walkways, adds valuable organic matter to the soil helping to improve soil structure when that organic matter breaks down, adds nutritive value, keeps soil from splattering on your plants during rains and it keeps your strawberry fruits, squash, what have you, resting on clean bedding instead of directly on the soil. It also helps to maintain a more even soil temperature. Continue reading

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Dry Beans – A Homesteader’s Staple

Dry beans, a homesteader’s staple should be in everyone’s larder whether they are a homesteader, prepper, city dweller or rural resident. As long as they are properly stored in a cool, dry location, they keep indefinitely without the need for refrigeration or freezing. They are versatile as they can be used in soups, stews, casseroles, chili and of course the proverbial pot of baked beans. As a bonus, they are nutritional powerhouses being exceptionally high in fiber, high in protein and cholesterol free (until an animal fat such as salt pork or bacon is added). And finally if you grow a garden, dry beans are easily raised requiring little attention until harvest time.

Beautiful Bowls of Beans

Beautiful Bowls of Beans

Continue reading

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Almost Killed Our Orchard and Half of Our Potatoes

Living on the ocean is wonderful but fog and dampness are typical throughout the growing season. It’s not unusual to hear water dripping off the roof eave over night from high moisture in the air. And along with that dampness come diseases. Diseases such as potato blight and scab, both of which are fungal in nature. Let me tell you how we almost killed our orchard and half of our potatoes recently.

Sad Looking Apple Leaf

Sad Looking Apple Leaf

Assessing Plant Health

Part of gardening is being vigilant with plant health. A daily walk through the orchard and garden can tell the gardener a lot about the health and vigor of the plants. Disease can spread pretty quick so it’s always nice to watch for the first signs of a problem. Those problems might be insects as well. Here are some things we look for: discoloration of the leaves, ants and other obvious insects such as aphids, potato bugs and cabbage worms plus we assess the leaf structure looking for holes or curling. Continue reading

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Establishing an Orchard

Establishing an orchard is a big investment not only in money but in time and effort as well. At our new Nova Scotia homestead, getting an orchard underway was a priority last spring and continued this spring. Selecting what varieties to plant can be overwhelming especially when it come to apples as there are so many from which to choose. Factors we considered when selecting varieties included plant hardiness, the growing zone in which we reside, disease resistance, our intended end use of any fruit we harvest as well as our desire to have some Heirloom varieties in our orchard. See our post of Jan 29, 2018, Order Now for Spring Planting  for details on all these factors.

Mulched Orchard Trees Just Coming to Life

Mulched Orchard Trees Just Coming to Life

We live in Canadian growing zone 5b, so to increase our chances of success, we tried to select varieties that are hardy to zone 5 or less. Because we want to keep our spray program to a minimum, disease resistance, particularly in regards to fireblight, was a major consideration so many of the varieties we selected take this into account. We also wanted the apple season to extend as long as possible by selecting a few “summer” apple varieties, “fall” apples and “winter” apples. Summer apples are supposed to ripen the end of August/beginning of September but are not long term keepers. Winter apples ripen in October, are meant to be stored for months and may even need time in storage to reach peak flavor. Fall apples ripen somewhere in between and have varying long term storage characteristics. Continue reading

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Vertical Grow Tower

It’s good to be back after a long hiatus. The new book manuscript and pictures are in the publisher’s hands and we can now focus on our normal routine. As you know, we’ve been gardening for a long time. Not only for the enjoyment and satisfaction of watching a seed germinate into something edible, but for us, food production is an integral part of being self-reliant. A vertical grow tower is something new for us.

Vertically Growing Strawberries

Vertically Growing Strawberries

There are many ways to grow a garden, but providing a seed a proper growing medium with adequate nutrition and water is as basic as it gets. How one goes about that is as variable as each of us are. Conventional till, no till, raised beds, vertical growing, greenhouses, hay/straw bales, container gardening, you get the idea. And for each of those methods, we all might try a tweak or refinement to improve the outcome as a variation.

Vertical Grow Tower

We’ve done a lot of this stuff and vertical growing has been a part of our annual growing techniques. We’ve always grown peas for example vertically on chicken wire fence run along the row for the peas to climb. Not only does it use space much more efficiently, but it makes picking a whole lot easier. I would argue that keeping the plants off of the ground keeps the plants healthier and allows air flow to help prevent diseases and mildews as well. Continue reading

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Fall 2018 Nova Scotia Off Grid Homestead Building Update

So!… Some might surmise we spent summer swimming, snorkeling; surely somewhat slouched semi-supine sipping sweet seven eleven slurpees by the seashore. Seriously? No way! We have been maxed out since we last wrote. Where do I even begin? Let’s give you the fall 2018 Nova Scotia off grid homestead building update.

Finished Exterior

Finished Exterior

Orchard and Garden

You know we planted the orchard and garden this past spring and most things did pretty well. We lost a couple orchard trees and plants but the majority are doing quite well. The everbearing varieties of strawberries, much to our surprise, gave us lots of berries and they’ve taken over the berry patch. I would normally pinch runners off and control them, but there’s another patch I want to establish so next spring, I’ll dig and transplant runners with the result being we’ll have 2 large beds going. That should be at least 150 plants. Continue reading

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Posted in Homestead Building | Tagged , , , , | 12 Comments

Drainage Tile and Foundation Membrane

One item I haven’t written about is waterproofing our foundation walls and preventing water problems in the basement. As a kid growing up, we lived in a house with a basement that became a shallow pond at one end during prolonged rains. The only thing missing was the stocked trout. It was a nightmare! For our current project we used drainage tile and foundation membrane to waterproof our off grid ICF home.

Johanna Working Around the Foundation

Johanna Working Around the Foundation

Continue reading

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Wiring Our ICF Off-Grid Home

The first thing I have to say is please don’t attempt to do any wiring of any kind unless you understand electricity and the proper way to install electrical boxes and circuits.

Mounted Outlet and Wire Grooves

Mounted Outlet and Wire Grooves

I don’t want to hear about any shiny red fire engines with lights flashing and siren blaring that needed to be called when the 12 VDC gizmo was wired to 120VAC and showed its’ displeasure by going full flame on. I’m not going to get into how to wire the house. But I will pass on some helpful tips on wiring our ICF off-grid home. Continue reading

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The Real Dirt on Garden Soil

Gardens with the vegetables and fruits they provide are an integral part of our self-sufficiency plan. We derive a great deal of satisfaction in providing the majority of our fruits and vegetables. In order to get the best results, we put a lot of time and effort into making our soil the best that it can be. Let me give you the real dirt on garden soil.

July 19 2018 Garden

July 19 2018 Garden

Dirt versus Soil

I haven’t looked up the proper definitions of dirt versus topsoil since in my mind, they are two very different subjects. For this conversation, dirt can be any layer of earth that may or may not support minimal plant growth. Whereas soil is a prime medium teaming with life and nutrients just waiting to give a seed a new lease on life. Continue reading

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Posted in Gardening | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments